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#IBSAwarenessMonth Low-FODMAP Book Giveaway!

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FODMAP LIFE EVERYTHING GUIDE GIVEAWAY

There’s still time left for you to spread awareness about #IBSAwarenessMonth !  We are currently holding a contest on Facebook and Instagram (one winner will win from each).  All you have to do is comment with your biggest Low-FODMAP challenge and a winner will be selected at random to win The Everything Guide To The Low-Fodmap Diet: A Healthy Plan for Managing IBS and Other Digestive Disorders by Dr. Barbara Bolen and Kathleen Bradley, CPC.  U.S. residents only please.  

I am so excited to be working with Dr. Bolen and Kathleen to help spread awareness for their book and put it into good hands for the people who need it most.  With this book you can learn how to:

  • Understand food allergies and intolerance
  • Identify high- and low-FODMAP foods
  • Eliminate FODMAP sources from your diet
  • Stock your pantry for success
  • Create your own personalized diet based on your unique needs
  • Re-create favorite recipes using low-FODMAP ingredients

Learn MORE bout the book below!

How to Spread the Word About IBS

  • Take part in our giveaway and share it with friends and family asking them to enter as well!
  • In 1997, the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD) designated April as IBS Awareness Month. During this time, they work to focus their attention on important health messages about IBS diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues.  They ask you to get involved by doing things like:
  • Get involved on social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr) and use these hashtags to find other people just like you! #ibsawarenessmonth #IBS #lowfodmap #lowfodmapdiet #tummytroubles
  • Share our social pages and blog with people you know who have IBS so they can learn about the low-FODMAP diet
  • If you think you have IBS, become your own health advocate and empower yourself!  Ask your doctor to:
    1. To get blood work to rule out celiac disease
    2. To take an HBT test (hydrogen breath test) – to check for a fructose, lactose or polyol absorption problem and to rule out SIBO
    3. To give you a proper diagnosis to utilize the low-FODMAP diet

Facts About IBS

iBS AWARENESS FODMAPSDid you know that Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) affects over 58 million (1 in 7) Americans and in developed countries, it may affect up to 1 in 5 adults(1)!  The cause of IBS is still unknown, but experts believe symptoms of IBS are brought on by a disruption to the interaction between brain, nervous system and gut and that food, stress and/or a person’s environment can act as “triggers” for symptoms.

IBS is more common in Western style diets where there’s more refined foods, GMOs and additives.  These crappy food choices play a role in inflammation and gut health and our bodies were never meant to try and decode them for digestion.  If your body could speak it probably would say: “What the &%$# is that?  Are you trying to trick me?”

Why do these crappy foods potentially trigger disease and gives us all sorts of reactions and complications?  It’s because 70% of the body’s immune system (your first line of defense) is connected to the digestive tract.  So throwing garbage food into your digestive system makes it even harder for your body to do the rest of its job – like fight off free radicals and foreign invaders.  Eat as many nutrient-rich foods as possible and remember that crappy food choices tend to make IBS symptoms worse and the rest of the population – sick, tired and moody!

IBS is more common in women then men

Many people are too embarrassed to get treatment or ask for help

There is no “cure” for IBS, however, it can be treated and symptoms can improve if an IBS patient works with their doctor.  A gastroenterologist, family doctor, or general practitioner can help to rule out possible causes from the patient’s past and current health history, and there are different blood and breath tests to try.  The next step is to work with a qualified professional trained in digestive health issues to carefully plan and manage the patient’s diet and lifestyle.  Examples of people who can help are: Certified Nutritionists or others trained in nutrition (like a Holistic Health Practitioner, Physical Therapist, Chiropractor, etc.) or a Registered Dietitian.  If stress seems to be playing a large role in IBS symptoms, opt for cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, hypnosis, yoga and/or meditation.

Remember to enter our giveaway to win this helpful book!

Book-Cover-885x1024

 

The Everything Guide To The Low-Fodmap Diet: A Healthy Plan for Managing IBS and Other Digestive Disorders

by Dr. Barbara Bolen and Kathleen Bradley, CPC.

BUY this book now!  Just click here.

Here’s a description of the book as told by the authors:

If you suffer with symptoms of IBS, you know that digestive troubles and pain can disrupt your day-to-day life. Fortunately, researchers have come up with a new treatment plan to help you control symptoms: a low-FODMAP diet. FODMAPs are a collection of short-chain carbohydrates that are difficult to digest and found in many common foods, like wheat, milk, beans, and some vegetables, fruits, and sweeteners. The Everything Guide to the Low-FODMAP Diet walks you through the step-by-step process for identifying your individual sensitivities–and gives you options and substitutions so you can enjoy your favorite foods again.

AuthorsPrintDr. Barbara Bolen, an IBS specialist, provides advice and tips for developing a personalized and realistic healthy eating plan. And with 150 low-FODMAP and gluten-free recipes, you can reduce digestive distress and feel great while enjoying satisfying and nutritious meals!

Thank you again to Dr. Bolen and Kathleen for writing this book and running a giveaway with me!

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Sources: IBS.org, IFFGD.org, (1) McFarland LV. State-of-the-art of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease research in 2008. World J Gastroenterol. 2008;14(17):2625-9. Hungin APS, Whorwell PJ, Tack J, Mearin F. The prevalence, patterns and impact of irritable bowel syndrome: an international survey of 40 000 subjects. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2003; 17(5):643-50.

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